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Unheard of Instruments in the Saxophone Family ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

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Clarence Randall Randy Compton shared The Music Empowers Foundation's photo to the group: Clemson University Tiger Band Alumni & Friends. ... See MoreSee Less

Let's teach kids to find the harmony #musiceducation

3 days ago

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Clarence Randall Randy Compton shared University of Kentucky Music Education's photo to the group: Clemson University Tiger Band Alumni & Friends. ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

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Clarence Randall Randy Compton shared David Wolfe's photo to the group: Clemson University Tiger Band Alumni & Friends. ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

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Randall Adkins shared Trent Allen's photo to the group: Clemson University Tiger Band Alumni & Friends. ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

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Randall Adkins shared James M Stepp's photo to the group: Clemson University Tiger Band Alumni & Friends. ... See MoreSee Less

1965 11 For that band member remembering the days of Clemson Band practice on old Riggs Field. Back of the YMCA and Post Office in distance. Foreground is one of the jump pits. I remember watching javelin, discus, long jump, and high jump practice on this field as well as running , It was well used.

5 days ago

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Randall Adkins shared his photo to the group: Clemson University Tiger Band Alumni & Friends. ... See MoreSee Less

Band Day-1961 Band Day in Death Valley in 1961. You can notice how the seats on the sides of the North Stands are lighter in color. This is in reference to the picture posted yesterday that was before the 1958 expansion of the North Stands. In this picture, you can clearly see the differing colors of the pre-1958 expansion compared to the 1958 expansion. You can also note the IPTAY in the endzones. IPTAY has been painted in the endzones on a few occasions over the years, primarily to recognize anniversaries of IPTAY. Band Day was obviously a big deal at Clemson in the 1960’s as noted by the thousands of performers on the field. In 1965, Clemson’s Band Day culminated when over 1,500 performers from area high schools came to Memorial Stadium to perform at halftime. In 1961, Tiger Band was excited to receive a permanent home for the Department of Bands, consisting of a practice room, sound-proof private rooms, offices, storage and a library. This was located in the basement of Johnstone Hall, a room that is still there today. In 1962, the band traveled to Washington DC with director John H. Butler and while there, played and sang the Clemson University Alma Mater for President John F. Kennedy. In 1964, a 100-piece Tiger Band performed during the halftime show of the Baltimore Colts and Minnesota Vikings football game; which was televised on CBS. Recently, the Tiger Alumni Band has played at one home game each year, drawing hundreds of former Tiger Band members back to Clemson to play Tiger Rag a few more times!

5 days ago

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Randall Adkins shared his photo to the group: Clemson University Tiger Band Alumni & Friends. ... See MoreSee Less

Tiger Band On Field In 1961 1961 season and shows Tiger Band on the field prior to the game. Although 1961 does not seem that long ago, it has been over 50 years since this picture was taken and you can certainly see the many differences in the East Endzone area. You notice right from the start that the preferred color of the fans was not the orange that you see today, but white. You also see the green tarp that lines the fence at the top of the east endzone to keep non-paying eyes from watching the game. The trees that line the northeast bank area are now long gone. Although I love the look of the current Memorial Stadium, I do miss the trees that were prominent in each of the corners of the stadium years ago. And finally, the design of the endzone is something that I have always liked from this era. Although you can’t see it behind the band, it reads “IPTAY” in the endzone.

5 days ago

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Another excerpt from Dad's Journal:
_____________
1966-1971
Clemson University
Clemson, South Carolina

As a high school band director I was unaccustomed to secretarial help. Not only did Jo Amerson keep me from missing deadlines, etc., she and her husband Mack have remained close friends. Mack was enrolled in graduate studies at Clemson University and, after receiving a doctoral degree, moved to Atlanta and a new job at Oglethorpe University.

Prior to departing for graduate school at the University of Georgia, John talked me through what was to be an approximation of my daily schedule. I would be teaching a class in music appreciation and a class in American Music as well as the marching band. Clemson University’s mascot is the Tiger and henceforth the marching band will be referred to as “Tiger Band.” John and I are of the same “school” when it comes to bands and I really did not anticipate any problems managing the marching or concert bands. The college classroom was another story. Classes met in a rehearsal room located in the basement of Johnstone Hall, a large prefabricated dormitory for men. The audiovisual equipment in the rehearsal room was used in classroom presentations. It was not unusual for enrollment in these classes to top fifty or more students and an occasional faculty member who audited the course. Joel Brawley was my first faculty auditor (fall 1966) and luckily I discovered his status before the end of the semester. (He asked a lot of questions!)

The football coach at Clemson was Frank Howard whose won/lost record at Clemson was the envy of most of Clemson’s competition, especially the University of South Carolina. Another legend by the name of Heisman coached at Clemson before there was a stadium for football. During Heisman’s day, the games were played on “Bowman Field.” This is the field still used for military review on Thursdays and more recently as a gathering place for Frisbee, touch football and just hanging out.

Tiger Band rehearsals began a few days before the students began matriculation. The rehearsals focused on becoming familiar with a season of music and marching fundamentals. The established military influence continued to be a part of the marching fundamentals and in the music we chose for the season. In other words, a lot of marches and a few show tunes for the two feature twirlers. Individual drill charts were nonexistent except for a detailed director’s chart. All drill instructions were given out from the director’s podium via a hand held ‘squawk” box.

Indoor music rehearsals were held in the band room, a small space that had large pillars that kept you from seeing the entire band and some from seeing you. Each music stand had a small metal can attached for use as an ashtray and cigarette butt receptacle. Clemson band members mastered the art of smoking, holding a cigarette and playing their instrument at the same time.

Some time during the first week of rehearsal, I was summoned to Walter Cox’s (Dean of Student) office. He had received complaints about students practicing drill routines early (5:00 AM) in the morning. I had no idea! The “rat” season in all its glory continued to unfold throughout the week, especially as I found human hair in trash baskets located in the rehearsal room. Eventually, all heads were shaved and topped off by a “rat hat.”

I was just beginning to learn about being the Tiger Band director at Clemson University!
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1 week ago

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